Lessons of the Garden

While sitting in the garden outside my school the other day, I noticed a butterfly sitting on one of the plants. I kicked myself mentally for forgetting my camera upstairs in the classroom, as we had just taken a brief tea break, but proceeded to get a closer look. It was then that I noticed the huge yellow wasp that sat only two leaves behind the butterfly.

I tell this story because as I continued to observe the butterfly, a gorgeous white and brown winged specimen, I thought it was rather fitting for my current experience. When I announced 8-months ago that I wanted to go to Morocco, my entire family about hit the roof. “It’s a third world country,” they’d say. They’d cite the gender inequality or the country’s struggling economy as reasons to stay home. The cultural and religious differences were highlighted each time I brought it up, the constant negativity bogging down my excited outlook.

The thing is, Morocco is a beautiful country. The people here are kind and helpful. The country thus far has been an amazing time, with each day offering a new promise of something entirely unprecedented in my short twenty years. That’s not to say, however, that it’s without it’s problems—catcalling on the street happens, several students in our program have gotten sick due to the different levels of food sanitation, etc. In the end though, the good outweighs the bad ten-fold.

For example, thieves are a reality here, especially in the crowded Medina where all of us are staying. My host mom has encouraged (and by that I mean chastised me if I didn’t) me to put my phone in my backpack and keep my pockets empty when walking to school. A girl in my class was walking yesterday and had her phone in her skirt and a man yanked it out and began walking away with it—a shopkeeper on the street, however, noticed and stopped him. Berating him and returning the phone to my classmate. This ugly side of the country exists, it’s present and demands attention, however the good is there and allows a level of protection and deserves recognition. The threat of the wasp shouldn’t take away from enjoying the butterfly.

I’ve been here for under a week but thus far it’s been incredibly fun as well as informative. We spend each day in class going over observations and questions, focusing on different aspects of the world we are just now getting to see. Then, during our free time, our group ventures out on our own to explore Rabat and see as much as possible. A month may sound like a long time, but in the grand scheme of things it’s not.

Thus far we’ve spent a lot of time getting to know the medina, in which we live with our host families. It offers a plethora of sights and sounds, always awash with activity and excitement. The markets provide interesting wares including (but not limited to) fresh fruit, beautiful rugs, goat heads, pigs’ feet, and hand made paintings and vases. The alleyways that lead to our respective houses wind and twist in mind baffling ways, each turn seemingly making less sense than the last. Yesterday I wasn’t paying attention and took a turn out of instinct, leading myself back to the front door, the first evidence that I’m actually managing to learn my way around.

The medina lets out into a marina where the river flows between Rabat and Sale. It’s a busy place with people milling down the edge of the river and boats ferrying passengers between the two cities. We stayed down there for a bit after class while we waited for another half of our group to meet back up with us. It was relaxing to watch the water and take in the people, sometimes it’s nice to just take a moment and sit while we’re here. Too often I think we get caught up in moving around and seeing all there is to see, but actually sitting and taking in the surroundings is a terribly underrated experience.

I could sit here and list all of the incredible things I’ve seen the last few days, but frankly I think it might bore those reading to bullet point down the list. Exploring the city has been fun though, and I will say that the juice here is incredible (and cheap). Thus far I’ve had an assortment of fruit called panache, lemon ginger, and avocado almond. All were awesome. Tomorrow we embark on our first in-country trip to Meknes, Fes, and the Roman ruins Velubilis. I’m excited to get underway and see what else this wonderful country has to offer.

Bringing it back to the point, the last few days have taught me that you shouldn’t allow fear to hold you back in your endeavors. If I had solely focused on the presence of the wasp, I wouldn’t have been able to observe the butterfly. That being said, if I had blundered around like an idiot and disregarded my surroundings, I definitely would have gotten stung. The balance isn’t necessarily a simple one, but it’s vital. I’ve cherished my time thus far and I am glad I chose Morocco to spend my time, however, I remain aware of the fact that I’m not in an environment I’m used to and there are new hazards to be wary of. Regardless, I still have over two weeks of excitement left, and I can’t wait.

 

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Cheers, New Zealand

In Maori, kia ora means hello. I’ve heard it countless times since coming here. It’s a warm greeting here in New Zealand, used by Maori and Pakeha (non-Maori/European) alike. In my time here, I’ve picked up a handful of Maori words that are used in every day practice here. However, as I packed up my bags last night and prepared for my departure in the morning, I found that I didn’t know the word for goodbye. This is a pretty basic one, so I was a bit taken aback. Upon examination though, I’ve realized that I haven’t really put a lot of thought into my leaving. This place, in the month I’ve been here, has felt like a home. It took twenty young, loud Americans in and adopted them into its culture, into its beautiful scenery and friendly atmosphere. Leaving feels wrong; I’ve found paradise and I’m not ready to let go. I looked up the word for goodbye today, noho iho rā, but the fact of the matter is, I’m just not quite ready to say it yet.

As I write this, I’m sitting in the Christchurch airport, waiting to board my flight to Auckland where I’ll catch my connection to Brisbane, my next destination. While I am looking forward to it, my excitement is hampered by the sadness over leaving New Zealand. This place has taken me in, adopted me into every day life. It shows by the familiar faces I see on campus, by the little kiwi slang that’s made its way into my speech. I notice it on my walk home, where I no longer frantically search for street signs, my feet instinctively knowing where to turn and which direction to head in. New Zealand has taken a piece of my heart, becoming a home, albeit a temporary one.

When I first came here, I was incredibly nervous it wouldn’t live up to my excessively high expectations. I had dreamed of visiting New Zealand since I was little, after reading a Nat Geo article describing the lush forests, blue water, and vibrant wildlife. It has surpassed everything I could possibly have dreamed of. I am so incredibly blessed to have had the opportunity to come here and to have the experience I now do at only nineteen. I would just like to take a second and thank everyone who made that possible. Thank you to my two best friends for volunteering to pick me up at the airport in Columbus despite the late hour and the inconvenience (you better not forget me). Thank you to all of the people who organized this program, as I was a bit nervous since this was the first year for it. You did a wonderful job; I wouldn’t change a thing. Thank you to my group, who made this trip that much the better. I’m so grateful to have met such a wonderful collection of people that I can now count as friends. Finally, the biggest thank you goes out to my mom for teaching me that the sky is the limit, for pushing me out of my comfort zone time and time again. I know letting me go all the way around the world wasn’t easy, and I appreciate it more than you know.

I feel as though this trip has taught me so much, both about the world and about myself. I’ve spent time acclimating to a whole new culture, but I’ve also had the opportunity to spend a lot of time alone with my thoughts. This trip provided a unique opportunity to take a step back from the hustle and bustle of life. On other holidays, you still have the stress of work or school weighing on you, you’re with your family and your phone probably doesn’t ever stop buzzing. Here, I’ve been on my own, my phone doesn’t work about 40% of the time and when it does, it’s some obscene hour back in the states. The isolation, at first, was a bit unsettling, but towards the end I relished in it. Taking a step back and being able to look at things objectively has been a blessing. This trip was sort of like hitting the pause button on life, while I’ll have to hit play soon, it’s been nice to take some time off.

I would like to think that I’ve grown a lot on this trip, that I’ve learned to take things one step at a time, to relax a bit. I would like to think that I’ve learned to let some things go and also clarified when it’s necessary give in a bit and where I need to demand more. I think the one thing I have learned for sure, however, is that my thirst for adventure isn’t going away anytime soon. Standing on top of a mountain, cruising through the Pacific Ocean, and standing on the very edge of a cliff, amongst other things have only left me eagerly searching for more, and I fully intend to find it.

It’s been a phenomenal month, one I’ll never forget. Each day, a new adventure revealed itself, each better than the last. I considered this trip to be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, but I’ve realized I’m going to have to do it at least twice. While I’ve done a lot in my short time here, there’s so much left to explore. I’ve fallen in love with this place, so I don’t think I’m going to be able to stay away. In the meantime though, thanks for the memories NZ, Cheers.

 

Ending on a High Note: A Weekend at Lake Tekapo

When I signed up to go on this trip, I didn’t really factor in the fact that there would be nineteen other people going. It was a non-issue for me; they would do their thing, and I would do mine. I imagined us as separate ecosystems, quite naively if I do say so. I didn’t stop to imagine the possibility that I might make some (lasting?) friendships.

This past weekend, sixteen of us twenty decided to plan a separate excursion since we had two days off for the queen’s birthday. Sixteen people planned an entire trip, got along, and had a blast. I don’t know about you, but I find that exceedingly impressive.

The entire bus ride down to Lake Tekapo, our chosen destination, I could hardly contain my excitement. Nearly every kiwi we had talked to described this place as a slice of heaven, their favorite place in the whole of New Zealand. Upon arrival, I could see why.

The lake is by far, the most intensely blue body of water I have ever seen. Accented by the snow-capped mountains, the lake glistened like something off a movie screen. I think each and every single one of our jaws hit the floor of the bus when we finally got there.

Another really great aspect of the trip was one that sort of happened by accident. Since it was a holiday weekend, Tekapo was booked full, with backpacker’s lodges not having any rooms available. As such, we decided to rent three hotel rooms and just sneak a few people in. At the time of the booking, we didn’t really pay attention to our accommodations aside from making sure we were close to the lake. We didn’t take the time to realize that we had somehow managed to nap three villas with a lakeside view at an unreal price. This was quite a nice surprise to find.

We started off our first day with a hike up Mt. John to watch the sunset. The hike was a lot of fun, but a lot more treacherous than we had initially planned for. Much of the trail had frozen over so we had to be especially careful. There would be long stretches of clinging to trees or climbing up over shrubs in order to avoid sliding down or injuring ourselves. With a lot of our group not having proper footwear nor a lot of hiking experience, it was a bit of a struggle to get to the top. Once we got there though, I think we were all very glad to have but in the effort.

Standing at the summit of a mountain with an altitude of 3,376 feet is an extremely sobering experience. You feel small, but also accomplished; calm, but simultaneously triumphant. Trees that stand at least five times taller me when next to them now looked like garden shrubs. Passing cars on the road looked like ants. The lake, in contrast, spanned the field of my vision, before disappearing into the horizon. The silence on the mountaintop was deafening, with each of us lost in our own thoughts as well as lost in the atmosphere of the mountain. I would like to think that we all got some sort of comfort at that summit, a peace of mind.

Personally, I sat on a rocky ledge for a bit, just taking in the scene, the crispness of the air and the general feeling of the place. Before this trip, I will admit to being a bit of a mess. Second semester had fried my nerves with stress academically, professionally, and personally (for a taste of this, check out my previous post “The Myth of the Blank Page). Coming here has been such a blessing in that I feel ten times lighter; I no longer have a weight pressing on my chest. I’ve taken a step back and taken the time to relax, to unwind, and to reason through issues that had previously overwhelmed me. Watching the sun sink between the mountains is something I’m never going to forget. I’d like to think that the next time life becomes a bit too much, I’ll just think of that mountaintop. I’ll think of the way the tired sun sank between those twin snowcapped peaks. How the light made the mountains look a bright purple color. Or how the silence was so incredibly pure: no talking, no birds, no busy cars or slamming doors. I like to think I will find that sense of peace again.

That’s enough on my teenage angst, however, and more onto the fun stuff. The hike down was a little rough, with the sun having gone and with it all the warmth we had previously enjoyed. The path had only gotten slicker with the dropping temperature, and so we clung to the brush for dear life, trusting no rock or patch of snow. At the bottom, however, it was all smiles as we reflected on that feeling at the summit.

We turned up for dinner quite early with the hike having left us ravenous. The restaurant we booked was notorious for their lakefront view…it’s just to bad we hadn’t factored in the pitch darkness of the night. Nonetheless, dinner was fun and quite good. I had a delicious udon noodle soup as well as some miso basted fried salmon. We all had some house made ice cream for desert as well (I ordered a delicious bowl of green tea flavored ice cream, my favorite).

After dinner, we headed back to our rooms, meeting back at our villa to hang out and chill for a bit. I mentioned at the beginning of the post how I didn’t really factor in making friends here. I can’t express what a mistake this was. The people I’ve met here are not people I would have encountered were it not for this trip. We come from all different backgrounds, majors, and ages. Our group dynamic is quite odd, and yet, it works. We are all kindhearted and truly look out for one another. Sure, we have a few jokes at the expense of each other (okay, a lot more than a few), but we know how to have fun and we genuinely have grown to care about one another. I count myself as extraordinarily lucky to now call them my friends.

A very unique part of Lake Tekapo is the fact that it has the second clearest view of the stars in the world. I’ve seen stars before, there aren’t that may lights on my street so they’re decently clear on a nice night. Not like this though. Around two in the morning, we all layered up and trekked out to see the stars in a field by our lodge. We plopped down and laid amongst the frozen blades of grass, taking in the sky above us. With the new moon making things even clearer, the stars were so unbelievably bright, they looked as though they were fake. The purple outline of the Milky Way was clearly visible, creating an awe-inspiring view. I will say, I didn’t stay out for all that long, after twenty or so minutes, I was ready for bed. The view was incredible, but I wanted to be rested for the sunrise trek to the lake in the morning.

At 7:00 in the morning, our alarm clocks blared, rising us from what’s probably been our best sleep since we got here (the room had heat, something most of our homestays do not). I will admit to a moment of weakness in which I contemplated going back to bed and missing the whole thing. I’m only human.

Upon dressing and layering up for a frigid morning, we headed out the door, groggy and blurry eyed. The second our feet hit the beach though, our eyes went wide and the weariness left us. I know most of those who read this blog are probably tired of me describing things as beautiful. Honestly, to me it sounds like a cop out. But the fact of the matter is that there are not any words in the English language that are capable of describing the sights of seen in the last few weeks. Lake Tekapo is one of the hardest. Seeing the lake at first light was a wholly unreal experience. The stillness of the lake combined with the frosty morning made it appear as though made of glass, the mountains accenting its near-frozen beauty.

We sat there for upwards of 45 minutes, watching the sun make its ascension to the sky. Again, totally silence ensued (for at least the first half of the time, we are a particularly chatty group). After, we headed back for breakfast and check out, readying ourselves for another hike.

Our hike this time wasn’t nearly as strenuous as the climb up Mt. John, it was actually quite the opposite. We took a bath around the lake, stopping at a few beaches here and there, enjoying a relaxed view of the scenery. We laughed and talked and munched on the snacks we had brought as well as some hurriedly made PB&Js (they were made with love though).

Overall, this trip has been one of the best parts of New Zealand. We planned it by ourselves and it went off without a hitch. That’s not to mention the fact that it was a boatload of fun. Everyone hung out together as well, it wasn’t just like we split off into our factions and ignored everyone else. While there are those of us who have become closer than others, we are, overall, a very inclusive group and that’s something that makes the trip that much the better. I suppose I will conclude by saying once again, how incredibly blessed I am to be on this trip. It’s better than anything I could have imagined.

Another Phenomenal Week

It’s hard to believe that as I type this, I’m finishing out my last weekend in New Zealand. It’s hard to believe how fast these three weeks have flown by and how much has occurred in such little time. I’ve had some incredible experiences as well as met some amazing people. I went from being surrounded by strangers in a foreign country to creating some phenomenal (lasting?) friendships in a place to astonishing to be real. I’m so incredibly grateful to all the people who made this trip as awesome as it has been, both here and back at home. Now, enough with the sappy nonsense and on to the fun stuff.

This week was a pretty low-key one, with the finishing of our research project being the prime focus (believe it or not, I do actually attend class here). We had a few adventures after class, but for the most part, school took center stage. One of these little excursions included a trip to the middle of nowhere to find this awesome t-shirt shop with my friend, Audrey. We got there right before they were about to close, and instead of booting us out, the lady let us browse and chat for a little bit which was really nice. I swear, Kiwis are the friendliest people on earth. After that, we sat in a café for what felt like just a few minutes, but turned out to be hours (side note, I got this caramel coffee cake that was to die for). The plan for the day had been to catch up with the rest of the group at the art gallery, where an event on Kiwi culture was being held, but we wound up missing them. That’s not to say we didn’t go to the art gallery though. I wasn’t initially thrilled about the event, as it didn’t seem like there was that much to do, but Audrey and I wound up sitting in on this really cool discussion on “Cultural Cringe”. It was an open talk about how New Zealanders perceive their culture and it was really interesting.

Another cool stop this week was the Antarctic center. Christchurch is the location of the U.S. Antarctic base so hence; there is an Antarctic center. The highpoint of this trip, however, is when we got thrown into a room that was, at the time, 17 degrees, a balmy summer day in Antarctica. However, this room was actually a storm simulator, which means wind turbines were turned on, lights went off, snow was kicked up, and the temp dropped to negative one degree Fahrenheit. I will say that the two other people aside from our group had to be pretty amused by the mob of 16 Americans running around yelling.

After the Antarctic center, we headed out for our final B.Y.O. (for an explanation of what this is, check out my previous post). Since my home sister was leaving that day, I met up with the group later and enjoyed a last meal with her and her family. Upon arriving at the B.Y.O. though, I found the group to be in good spirits to say the least. This B.Y.O. was definitely the most entertaining with two of the boys deciding it would be a bright idea to down two Chinese hot peppers. David wound up under the table and Wes wound up in tears, as did the rest of the group. We topped the night off by heading to the foundry, the university bar/event center to watch the live band before heading home.

The real fun began yesterday though, with our cancelled trip to Akaroa being made up. Akaroa is a port on the East coast of the south island that was formed by a volcano millions of years ago. We got to really explore the unique area by taking a harbor cruise out past the bay and into the Pacific. On the way, we saw breathtaking landscapes, a volcanic vent, penguins, dolphins, and seals. It was fantastic, seated at the front of the boat, I had a front row view. A quick note about the dolphins: they weren’t just your average run of the mill dolphin (you know, because I see dolphins all the time back in Ohio). These dolphins were Hector’s dolphins, the most rare dolphin in the world. Growing to only a meter in length and having unique white markings on them, they are only found here in New Zealand. I’m so glad we were able to make up the harbor cruise on a day so gorgeous. The water was probably the bluest I’ve ever seen and with the sun hitting the ocean mist as it rose from the waves, it looked photoshopped. Our boat, for the most part, was silent on the way back. There’s just something about gliding over the water, with the wind in your hair and the tang of salt on your lips that is so incredibly clarifying. I don’t know how you could have a worry in the world with such an incredible experience. HAR_1283.jpg

We finished the day off with some fish and chips and a little bit of souvenir shopping around the town. The drive home, however very weary after a long day, was gorgeous. We weaved through mountain roads and watched the sun set over the city. I swear, I really, really don’t want to leave this place

Today proved to be just as awesome as we trekked off to Castle Hill. For those of you who don’t know, this is where both The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and The Chronicles of Narnia were filmed. Upon arrival, I could see why.

Massive rocks jutted from snowy outcroppings as the land wove its way into the mountain ranges. The air was warmer than usual, but still crisp from the snow so most of us wound up ditching our winter jackets as we climbed up the hills. The rocks were unreal, and upon climbing them, the view beyond was just as fantastic.

Castle hill wasn’t our only stop for the day though; we also headed to a local farm. Since New Zealand has more sheep than people, it was only fitting that we should see one before we left. The farm was really fun, with us getting to see a farm in action as well as eat a phenomenal farm fresh meal (I’m still full). The real fun though, came when the farmer decided to prove his point on the importance of sheep dogs. He had volunteers attempt to herd the sheep through the gate, two at a time, just as the dogs do. Naturally, Audrey and I volunteered.

HAR_1798.jpgToday marks the end of our university-sanctioned weekend excursions. Again, I don’t want this trip to end. However, I am excited for tomorrow as our group heads off on a mini trip we planned to Lake Tekapo for the queen’s birthday. Lake Tekapo is supposed to have the second clearest star gazing in the world as picturesque turquoise waters dotted with wildflowers. This time of year, it’s also supposed to be covered in a light frost. We’re staying the night, so we’ll have plenty of time to take in the sights. I can’t wait.

Another Day in Paradise

Upon reviewing my last few posts, it seems as though the same words keep popping up. “Fantastic”, “beautiful”, “amazing”, “surreal”, “gorgeous”, amongst others that basically mean the same thing. The fact of the matter is, words are wholly inadequate when attempting to describe my experiences over the last week and a half. From sprawling mountains to crystal clear ocean water, my definition of beauty has since been redefined. IT seems as though every time we turn a corner, New Zealand offers something even better than the last. It is unreal that such a place exists. I could write forever and still be unable to fully capture the freshness of the air here, or the specific shade of blue the sky gets when the sun peaks out from behind the clouds. I’m still damn well going to try though.

The last few days have been decently low key by recent standards. We spent a lot of time exploring the city since most of our afternoons have been pretty open. We also spent some time at the Canterbury Museum as well as the Christchurch Gallery of Art. The art gallery actually just reopened in December 2015 since it was so badly damaged in the earthquake. They had some neat exhibits and most of the artwork was very unique. While I enjoyed the experience overall, I do have to say that it does not top the Cleveland Museum of Art (my absolute favorite place back home), but then again, perhaps I’m biased.

Exploring the city turned out to be a lot of fun. Our aimless wandering resulted in some pretty cool finds, including a lot of street art sightings (photos are up on a separate post) and a ridiculously elaborate playground. This playground deserves a post in and of itself, complete with trampolines, zip lining, and a rope climbing station, this thing was unreal. It also kept a handful of 19-22 year olds busy for an hour or so.

One of the really unique experiences of the week was Coffee and Jam at the Ministry of Awesome. In order to promote small businesses in the Christchurch area, Ministry of Awesome hosts a small event where people from the community come in and either give or listen to pitches from local businesses. This is all done over, yes you guessed it, coffee and Jam. It was interesting to hear from all of these local businesses, which included a startup clothing company and a t-shirt printing company that uses only ethically made clothing. As well as supporting local businesses this company gives much of the money to support victims of human trafficking. Overall, it was a really neat little gathering (side note—they have lemon jam here and it is heavenly).

Last night, we decided to take a night out and go see a local band play at the university pub, The Foundry. The advertised band, The Tunes of Ire, came on around eleven, aka when the last busses start to leave so we only caught a few minutes of them before heading out. The cover band that opened for them was awesome though. Dancing to songs like Beverly Hills, Brown Eyed Girl, and Riptide with all of the friends I’ve made on the trip was a really fun time. This trip has been a blast, and the people I’ve gone with have made it all the better.

Today marked our day off from the classroom though, so we got to spend the whole day out in the country, exploring. Starting at the Tannery, a little collection of shops and cafes, we then headed off to the famous Christchurch Gondola (the best way I can describe it is sort of like a ski lift up a mountain). At the top of Mount Cavendish, we got to walk around a bit and take in the sights. The view was stunning. Looking over the mountain at the city was quite literally, breathtaking. Out in the distance, the ice-capped peaks of mountains on the other side of the mountain poked through the clouds. Upon moving to the other side, one could clearly see the ocean and the Lyttlton bay area. I can honestly say I have never seen anything like it. New Zealand continues to amaze and surprise me, this view being no exception. This post and the photos to follow can’t do it justice.

From the Gondola, we headed into Lyttleton to enjoy some lunch and poke around the shops for a bit. A busy port, the town Lyttleton isn’t very big or developed (hence the name), but it’s a quaint little area with a few neat shops and cafes. The Lyttleton café is amongst these (again, hence the name), and our group settled in there to grab some food and play euchre (I don’t partake in the card game, I just like to watch the tension rise as the game progresses). I ordered a chicken and mushroom pie that may actually have been the single most delicious thing I have ever eaten. From lunch, we poked around a bit in the shops and then headed back to the bus to Sumner Beach.

I will tell you that I literally ran out onto the beach the second we arrived. My jaw about hit the floor as we drove past the crashing waves, blooming wildflowers, and barnacle encrusted rocks. Walking out onto the beach was like walking onto a movie set. The crunch of the sand beneath my feet combined with the salty tang in the sea breeze was magnificent. I spent a better part of the hour taking photos and exploring the sea caves and tidal pools throughout the beach. The beach was filled with activity from our group as well as surfers, dogs, and local passerby. It was fun to watch all of the hustle and bustle in such a gorgeous setting. Eventually though, I just sat back and enjoyed the sun on my face as it started to set along the coast. Like I said, completely unreal.

Today was one fantastic day, a great way to end a full week of adventure. Tomorrow, we are set to explore Akaroa, visiting a farm there as well as taking a boat into the harbor, weather permitting. Thus far, New Zealand has exceeded every possible expectation, I don’t know how I’m ever going to say goodbye to this amazing place.

Christchurch Day 1

A Walking Tour of Christchurch

One of the many questions I found myself facing from friends and family before I left was a basic one: “are you nervous?” My response, of course, was always a quick no and an expression of excitement. In truth, I was nervous; not for the flights, or going abroad, or anything along those lines, but I was nervous that New Zealand wouldn’t live up to my admittedly high expectations. Based on today, it has not only lived up to them, it’s surpassed them.

It’s so hard to believe that my first day in Christchurch has already come and gone. Let me just start by saying that my homestay is absolutely phenomenal. Marie and Phillippe are two of the sweetest people I’ve ever met. They immediately made me feel welcome in their home and they are incredibly interesting to chat with. Originally from South Africa, they came to New Zealand roughly twenty years ago. Since then, they’ve been all over the world and brought quite a bit of it back with them as they have hosted numerous international students. Currently, they are also hosting another student aside from myself from Singapore. Her name is Rachel and from what I’ve gotten to know about her she’s just as amazing. We spent my first night gathered around a world atlas, showing one another the places we’re from and sharing places we’ve travelled.

I will say, however, I was a little disappointed when the only real question they had about America was pertaining to Donald Trump.

We started the day today at the University of Canterbury, a quaint little campus with a population of 11,000. From there, we started our walking tour of Christchurch at the North side of the botanical gardens. Everything was absolutely beautiful, with the leaves having changed for autumn the trees are absolutely stunning. Unfortunately for me, I was only able to capture a few photos from the excursion as I forgot to change my settings from multiple exposure mode. I was not pleased to say the least. Still, I got some pretty nice shots and I’m going to attempt to put up a gallery at some point.

From there, we walked around a bit and caught glimpses of the Canterbury Museum and the Christchurch Art Gallery, both of which will be visiting in the next few weeks. Our next destination was a particular favorite of mine, the Re:START container mall.

Christchurch was hit with a series of devastating earthquakes in 2011 and 2012 that have left the city with devastating damage and a high need to rebuild and reorganize. Within a year of the quakes, the container mall was put up as a temporary shopping center built entirely of shipping containers. The outcome is something unlike anything I’ve ever seen before, an interesting aesthetic with a very upbeat and new sort of vibe. The shops were very cool as well, offering a lot of different items and trinkets (barring the Lululemon which is still just as ridiculously overpriced as the states). The idea for the mall was kind of a wildcard, but the place has grown from just 27 businesses in 2011 to over 50 today. It’s become a cornerstone for the tourist industry and a favorite amongst the locals.

Our next stops were more somber ones, starting with the Bridge of Remembrance. Having just been reopened a few weeks ago, the bridge commemorates all of those fallen in past wars and is one of two war memorials in Christchurch. After our visit there, we visited 185 Empty White Chairs—a memorial to all those lost in the 2011 earthquake. Each of the chairs is unique and represents an aspect of the individual it represents. The chairs range from a wheelchair, a student’s desk, to the most heartbreaking: an infant’s car seat. The 185 square meters of grass the chair sit on was originally supposed to be a temporary, with the artist’s statement being: “installation is temporary—as is life”, but following a pouring of positive feedback, speculation says it may be here to stay for good.

Following the memorials, our group stopped at the Cardboard Church, a temporary place of worship for the people of Christchurch while the church decides what to do with the old cathedral. Upon paying a visit to the former cathedral, once a hallmark of the city, it was really apparent how much damage the quake had done. Completely fenced off, it was heart wrenching to see a place of such grandeur as broken as it is now. The entire front of the building had completely collapsed and the bell towers had fallen and lay amongst the rubble, etchings of the phrase “kia kaha”, “stay strong” in Maori, could be seen all along the fence and surrounding fixtures.

One of our final stops was New Regent Street, the only complete heritage streetscape in Christchurch. The Spanish Mission Architecture is home to several cafes and boutiques, making it an extremely popular and unique site. New Regent Street is also home to the Isaac Theatre Royal, the premiere performing arts center in Canterbury. The theatre was severely damaged in the quakes, but has recently been completely rebuilt.

Following a stop at the bus exchange to fill up all of our metro cards, most of us decided to stay in the city and head out for drinks to get to know one another a little better. Having been one of the last to arrive, I felt as though I’d been playing catch up the whole time trying to meet everyone in our group. We headed over to a place called Engineers, a nifty little bar recommended by our coordinator. It had a gorgeous rooftop view with an open patio section. We stayed until about 5 (*around one a.m. back in Ohio), and then headed back to our respective homestays. Everyone from the group seems really nice and extremely friendly, which is good considering we’ll be spending a lot of time together over the next month!

Overall, New Zealand has been phenomenal so far. It’s kind of similar but the differences are extremely glaring. A prime example of this occurred this morning upon my realization that the toilet was not, in fact, in the bathroom. About to pee my pants, I finally broke down and asked where exactly it was located and my homestay looked at me as though I had three heads. In New Zealand, apparently, the toilet has its own separate room. This was obviously news to me.

Overall, kiwis (what the people of New Zealand are called), all seem to be extremely friendly and totally open to conversation. At lunch, our server was particularly funny, knowing exactly who Ohio State is, he informed us that, “scarlet and gray only belong together on speed bumps” and “who the hell calls themselves after a nut”. The kiwis very much enjoy banter, making for some very funny conversations.

To end this, I’ll list a few major differences I’ve noticed:

  • “Tramping” means hiking in New Zealand. This obviously has a very different meaning in the states.
  • Kiwis are very eco-friendly, for example, you won’t find paper towels in any of their bathrooms. They either have air dryers, or they use a paper towel dispenser, except instead of the paper towels its sort of like a revolving cloth towel.
  • There’s gorgeous street art everywhere. Here it isn’t considered graffiti and there’s no negative connotation, it’s just art.
  • DRIVING ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE ROAD IS STRANGE. I’ve nearly gotten into the driver’s side of the vehicle at least four times. Roundabouts are also terrifying.
  • In restaurants, there’s no tipping and you need to get up and pay, the servers don’t bring the bill to you.
  • The coffee is 10x better here.
  • At the university, students go “flatting” where housemates of each flight all start with a red card. This red card gets pulled at various times throughout the year, once by each roommate. When the red card gets pulled, its that roommates’ responsibility to come up with a crazy party idea or a dare for each of their roommates to complete (generally revolving around alcohol).
  • I can only ever understand about 50% of what’s being said to me due to various slang words including “Ta”, “cheers”, “catch ‘ya” and loads more. I’ve also been made fun of about 17 separate times for saying “college” instead of “uni”.
  • Kiwis are super friendly, love to party, and curse often. I think I’ve found my people.

 

 

 

 

 

The Next Great Adventure: The Pacific

When I was five years old, I rolled out of my twin sized bed around 11:30 at night and decided that I wanted to go on an adventure. I grabbed my Jansport backpack off its hook in my closet, packed it full of clothes and my favorite stuffed animals, and headed out the back door. From there, I threw the things I had gathered in a wagon from my shed and headed on down the street.

I got all the way through our neighborhood onto the main road before I turned around. The only reason I did turn around, actually, is because the sidewalk ended and I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to navigate my wagon from there on (I was five cut me a break).

My mother was not happy when the police returned me a few hours later.

I didn’t understand her anger at me. I had just decided I wanted to expand my horizons and do some sightseeing, I didn’t mean it as a slight or an insult. I loved my family and I had every intention of returning—at some point.

While I do concede that my five-year-old adventures were ill advised at best, I think this story goes to show my innate curiosity about the world around me. From a young age, I’ve wondered what’s behind each turn and longed for new experiences and adventures. Now, at nineteen, I’m sitting at my gate preparing to travel 8,684 miles away from home. New Zealand has been a destination I’ve dreamed of seeing my entire life. It’s surreal, having the opportunity to go see a place I’ve only read about in books (It’s going to be far less surreal on the 16-hour plane ride from Dallas to Sydney, I’m sure).

While I’m in New Zealand, I’ll be focusing on linguistics and the Maori culture for my class. What’s really cool about this though, is that the whole purpose is to really immerse oneself into the island’s culture. I have the opportunity to stay with a New Zealand family as well as another international student from Indonesia. I’ll also be studying at Canterbury University, the largest in the country (not that that necessarily says much, they have more sheep than people there). We spend most of our time outside of the classroom exploring the city of Christchurch as well as getting out into the island a few times for more long-term excursions such as whale watching and Hanmer hot springs. The point is: this is one hell of an adventure.

My stay in New Zealand is four weeks long; four weeks of gorgeous beaches, breathtaking mountains, and of course, penguins. From there, I elected to extend my trip by heading over to the land down under and making my way down the gold coast.

I start my time in Australia with three days in Brisbane, where I intend to explore Bondi beach, hang out at Southbank, and enjoy the unique atmosphere of the city. From Brisbane, I’ll head for another three days in Sydney where I intend to do the Split Bridge to Manly coastal hiking walk, experience Port Jackson Harbor, and take in the views from the famous Sydney Harbour bridge. Finally, I cap it off with a four-day tour of Melbourne, which is supposed to be one of Australia’s most unique cities with an art culture guaranteed to knock my socks off. I can’t wait.

While my excitement is at an all time high, I do have to admit that I will miss my friends and family a ton, but I can’t wait to come home and tell them all the crazy stuff I will hopefully see and do. Saying goodbye to my mom at the airport today was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do (her tearing up DID NOT HELP), but I’m so grateful to everyone (especially my mom) in my life for pushing me to achieve my dreams and not be afraid to put myself out there. I wouldn’t be where I am today without the support of my phenomenal mother and all of my friends (a special shout out to Meghan and Allie for picking me up at the airport when I get back home). A nerdy little sixth grader once held up a copy of National Geographic and vowed to see the mountaintops of New Zealand one day. At nineteen I’m fulfilling my dream and I couldn’t be happier. But that’s all for now, I’m off to the land of the kiwis where I will be spending my days amongst the whales, seals, and penguins, Oh my!